Hundreds from Palmers Green attended debate about the £30million 'Mini-Holland' cycling scheme

Costas Georgiou, chairman of Green Lanes Business Association, is concerned about the Mini-Holland scheme

Costas Georgiou, chairman of Green Lanes Business Association, is concerned about the Mini-Holland scheme

First published in News
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Enfield Independent: Photograph of the Author by

More than 200 people from Palmers Green packed into a small church to express their view on a multi-million cycling scheme.

Enfield Southgate MP David Burrowes invited nearby residents, local councillors, cyclists and shopkeepers to the public meeting at St Monica’s Church in Stonard Road, Palmers Green to discuss the ‘Mini-Holland’ money.

The meeting discussed the impact that the £30million scheme will have on Palmers Green high street, Green Lanes where proposals have been made to build cycle lanes through the high street.

This has raised concerns amongst shopkeepers and Costas Georgiou chairman of Green Lanes Business Association and councillor candidate, who believes that this will cost the high street its parking.

He said: “This could damage businesses in our high street massively. We can see in the plans that cycle lanes are proposed to be built on green lanes – but that appears to be at the cost of parking spaces.

“We must keep parking to ensure that people are still coming to our shops. We are not entirely against the cycling scheme and by all means put cycle lanes around the high street but putting it through could kill off our businesses and our high street.”

Enfield Borough Council, who won the money with their bid to Mayor of London Boris Johnson, has insisted on numerous occasions that there will be consultation taking place before anything is set in stone.

The Enfield Independent has reported fears coming from Enfield Town residents and businesses who claim that re-directing traffic around the town will cause more accidents and could have a negative impact on businesses.

The Enfield Southgate MP said: "I was pleased to arrange the first public meeting about the mini holland cycle scheme. The significant number of people attending and the views expressed highlights the need for this public engagement to be the first amongst many if the community is to get fully behind the scheme.

“Enfield won a big amount of money but a first task of the Council after the elections will be to fully consult and if necessary fully revise the scheme if they are to get businesses and residents to back mini holland in Enfield."

Consultation is due to take place after the council elections on May 22, 2014.

Comments (4)

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10:33am Wed 30 Apr 14

DavidFlint says...

The concern of the Palmers Green shopkeepers is understandable but many comments at the meeting were really over the top. Many studies have shown that the main way in which people travel to local shopping centres is on foot. For this group the noise, speed and air pollution brought by cars is far from attractive.

With population rising and car ownership falling (slowly, but falling) we need to prepare for a future in which the car is less important and other travel modes more important. To get to that future someone - perhaps the Green Lane Businesspeople - needs to fund some real research. Then we could base planning on facts not guesswork.
The concern of the Palmers Green shopkeepers is understandable but many comments at the meeting were really over the top. Many studies have shown that the main way in which people travel to local shopping centres is on foot. For this group the noise, speed and air pollution brought by cars is far from attractive. With population rising and car ownership falling (slowly, but falling) we need to prepare for a future in which the car is less important and other travel modes more important. To get to that future someone - perhaps the Green Lane Businesspeople - needs to fund some real research. Then we could base planning on facts not guesswork. DavidFlint
  • Score: 11

11:52am Wed 30 Apr 14

Andy_Pagin says...

"we need to prepare for a future in which the car is less important"

Really? From the DOT statistics for October - December 2013

"Annual traffic across all motor vehicle classes increased by 1.3 per cent"
Car traffic increased by 1.0 per cent
LGV traffic increased by 3.4 per cent
HGV) traffic increased by 0.8 per cent.
Motorway traffic rose by 2.2 per cent
Minor road traffic rose by 1.6 per cent
‘A’ road traffic remained broadly stable with 2012 levels
"we need to prepare for a future in which the car is less important" Really? From the DOT statistics for October - December 2013 "Annual traffic across all motor vehicle classes increased by 1.3 per cent" Car traffic increased by 1.0 per cent LGV traffic increased by 3.4 per cent HGV) traffic increased by 0.8 per cent. Motorway traffic rose by 2.2 per cent Minor road traffic rose by 1.6 per cent ‘A’ road traffic remained broadly stable with 2012 levels Andy_Pagin
  • Score: -7

12:16pm Wed 30 Apr 14

AdrianLauchlan says...

I attended the meeting as the Enfield a Borough Coordinator for the London Cycling Campaign. However I was not invited and am not aware of any other cycling organisation or cyclists being specifically invited. I found out about the meeting through other means.

It was disappointing to find that those who made presentations all gave 'anti' views on the Mini Holland bid and that no-one with pro cycling or pro the scheme opinions were invited to make presentations. The meeting came across as a Mini Holland Bashing event at which a large number of comments were both alarmist and untrue. In particular Costas Georgiou presented an 'artists impression' of Green Lanes post the implementation of the scheme showing cycle lanes on both sides of the road and nowhere for cars to park, this was presented as a fait accompli along with the concept that without cars the high street would die as people wouldn't be able to park to buy a paper or have a coffee etc.

I live about 1/2 mile from the High Street and often walk there to shop. I would never consider driving there to buy a paper or a coffee. In 2012 the London Councils commissioned a review called 'The relevance of parking in the success of urban centres' in which there is a table showing the results of a survey in Bristol of how people get to the shops. 55% walked, 10% cycled, 13% took Public Transport and 22% drove, this despite shopkeepers estimating that 41% drove. Additionally, when asked, people who walked were most likely to visit 5 days or more (50%), followed by cyclists (37% visit 5 days or more), public transport 27% and car users only 14%.

The population of London has grown by 12% between 2001 and 2011 according to the latest census results yet car ownership in London has fallen by 100,000 cars in the same period. More and more people are abandoning the use of cars in London and those that have then are using them less.

In the rush hour in Central London around 24% of all journeys are now by bike with up to 64% in some areas, additionally public transport use has increased by 7.3% for people getting to work.

There isn't the space anymore for everyone to have a car and this should be recognised by politicians, councils, shopkeepers and the public. We need alternative methods of transport whether that be public transport, walking or cycling and everyone should encourage the increased use of these methods, especially shop keepers. Cars use huge amounts of public space and very often only have one occupant. Far more people using far less space can and do visit our high streets and contributed far more financially to those shops than car drivers.
I attended the meeting as the Enfield a Borough Coordinator for the London Cycling Campaign. However I was not invited and am not aware of any other cycling organisation or cyclists being specifically invited. I found out about the meeting through other means. It was disappointing to find that those who made presentations all gave 'anti' views on the Mini Holland bid and that no-one with pro cycling or pro the scheme opinions were invited to make presentations. The meeting came across as a Mini Holland Bashing event at which a large number of comments were both alarmist and untrue. In particular Costas Georgiou presented an 'artists impression' of Green Lanes post the implementation of the scheme showing cycle lanes on both sides of the road and nowhere for cars to park, this was presented as a fait accompli along with the concept that without cars the high street would die as people wouldn't be able to park to buy a paper or have a coffee etc. I live about 1/2 mile from the High Street and often walk there to shop. I would never consider driving there to buy a paper or a coffee. In 2012 the London Councils commissioned a review called 'The relevance of parking in the success of urban centres' in which there is a table showing the results of a survey in Bristol of how people get to the shops. 55% walked, 10% cycled, 13% took Public Transport and 22% drove, this despite shopkeepers estimating that 41% drove. Additionally, when asked, people who walked were most likely to visit 5 days or more (50%), followed by cyclists (37% visit 5 days or more), public transport 27% and car users only 14%. The population of London has grown by 12% between 2001 and 2011 according to the latest census results yet car ownership in London has fallen by 100,000 cars in the same period. More and more people are abandoning the use of cars in London and those that have then are using them less. In the rush hour in Central London around 24% of all journeys are now by bike with up to 64% in some areas, additionally public transport use has increased by 7.3% for people getting to work. There isn't the space anymore for everyone to have a car and this should be recognised by politicians, councils, shopkeepers and the public. We need alternative methods of transport whether that be public transport, walking or cycling and everyone should encourage the increased use of these methods, especially shop keepers. Cars use huge amounts of public space and very often only have one occupant. Far more people using far less space can and do visit our high streets and contributed far more financially to those shops than car drivers. AdrianLauchlan
  • Score: 15

7:39am Thu 1 May 14

Enfieldian14 says...

I am very keen to cycle more - but need these changes pushed through to make it safer for me. At the moment, I have to rely on public transport - at great expense.
I am very keen to cycle more - but need these changes pushed through to make it safer for me. At the moment, I have to rely on public transport - at great expense. Enfieldian14
  • Score: 4

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